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Are you achieving the 7 key points for a great site? 

In the busy world of marketing, as a consumer, you are bombarded with many messages a day. When finding out information, you are normally in the ‘Micro-Moment’ which is a critical opportunity for brands to shape the decisions of a consumer. You never get a second chance to make a first impression, so when a consumer clicks through to your homepage, it is undoubtedly one of the most important pages on your website. For any given company, the homepage is its virtual front door. If you have searched for those shoes you need, you would expect to go straight to that product, or info page. But I am not talking about search activity today. I am talking about your online front page. If we have a new visitor to your site, we want them to like what they see and not make a quick U-turn and click the ‘back’ button as they didn’t like what they saw. It is still true today, a lot of people still judge a book by its cover. A website home page needs to have great design, as well as work well. That full package of beauty and brains.

There are many things to consider when creating a good website home page. 

  1. It clearly answers “Who is the business” and "What the business does”. A business needs to answer these questions to that the visitor knows they are in the right place.
  2. It resonates with the target audience. Your home page talks to the right people in the right tone and language.
  3. Communicate the value proposition (competitive advantage). The page needs to get the visitor to stick around and not navigate away to your competitors.
  4. Optimised for multiple devices. There are still too many sites today that are not mobile optimised. Over 80% of NZ consumers view websites on their mobile phones. 
  5. Good call to actions. These direct visitors to a logical step on the site and get them to dig deeper into the site and move them down further in the sales funnel. Whether it’s a “Free Trial”, “Buy Now”, “Contact Now”. Call to Actions turn your homepage into a sales or lead generation engine and not just a brochure.
  6. A website that is always changing. The best websites aren’t static. 
  7. You have great design. A well-designed page is able to communicate clearly your value as a business and help your customer to the next step.

Some sites that we like which have the key assets to consider for a good website:

www.xero.com/nz/

It’s easy to consume, and clear call to action buttons. The sublime heading of “Quit chasing invoices” is a pain point a lot of business have, and Xero are communicating that they can solve this issue. It draws me in to find out how. 

www.dropbox.com/

This is the ultimate example of simplifying. It uses lots of white space and simple visuals. Clear and concise what they do - “take your docs anywhere”, “Send videos quickly”. A strong call to action at the top of “Sign up for free”. 

www.4rsmokehouse.com/

This site just makes us want to go out and get a steak. It makes the taste experience jump out of the page with a simple short video and photography of a steak and preparation of food. The great headline of “Brisket. 18 years to master. Yours to savour.” Great use of the parallax scrolling to get all the information on services, menus etc. 

As a business, are you achieving the 7 key points for a great site? 

P.s We walk the talk and are redesigning our website, as they say the best websites are not static. Watch this space. 

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Keeping up with the trends

An oldie but a goodie, and a case study now presented in Universities worldwide, the “Raise your right hand” campaign by De Beers in 2003 responded to a declining trend in traditional weddings and proposals, and the resulting decline in engagement ring purchases, which was the bread and butter of the industry.

The campaign was clever, on trend, and inspiring for an increasing audience of independent women with strong incomes and ideas “Your left hand says ‘we’, Your right hand says ‘me’” brought meaning and identity to the notion of ‘how do we get women to buy themselves a ring?’. Consider how trends now are affecting our businesses, and how we can grow with the times, or as in this case, become an advocate for the change. As with most things, timing is of the essence.

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Could technology developed for safety end up being used for marketing?

Creating a safer passage for ambulances in Sweden to get to an emergency. We all know the situation where you suddenly get an emergency vehicle straight up behind you, straight in front of you, or out of the corner of your eye.  It’s a dangerous pathway they must take to get to the emergency at hand. Sweden is trialling a way to hijack people's radios in cars to let them know that an ambulance is coming their way, so they can pull over safety and let it pass. 

How does this relate to marketing you say. This sort of technology could over time be how a restaurant, store or business is able to shout out to you as you are driving towards or past. Just like how ‘FourSquare’ uses their location intelligence on your mobile phone (you have to download the app first), a business can locate and message the public when they are close by via their radio. 

But for the time being, I think it’s a great way to have safer roads for the ambulances to drive when heading to an emergency at high speed, as well as the general public getting more advance warning that a vehicle is heading their way. Maybe we could see this on the NZ roads soon.

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What we've been working on...

In late 2016, we helped the WaikatoDHB relaunch their online healthcare service, SmartHealth.

To date, the campaign has brought over 6000 people to the SmartHealth landing page and of those people who viewed the online sign-up form, 30% of people have completed it.

We think that it's a great initiative offered by the DHB and recommend that you check it out at www.smarthealth.org.nz

 

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It's Hamilton Gardens Festival Time

King St is a platinum sponsor of the Hamilton Gardens Festival. We've been doing this for nine years. We love it.

It's a big investment in head hours for us every year but it's also really worthwhile. Some guidelines we use when we assess sponsorships:

- A fit with our business - the festival is all about art and creativity so that was easy
- Opportunities for us to express ourselves creatively
- Professional people to work with
- Opportunities for networking and entertaining
- Opportunities for our team and their families
- Gaining strong coverage for our brand

The festival ticks all these boxes, plus a few more so we'll keep doing it for a while yet. Get along to an event, it's absolutely magic! www.hgaf.co.nz

Happy new year!!

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